Another Day/Another Time Concert.

mememolly:

witsradio:

little-veganite:

mayoroffuckstickjunction:

thecuteoftheday:

Heidi the rabbit!
Heidi has arthritis in her knees and hips so to help with the pain, she swims a few times a week!
Sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet!


“sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet”

Good morning.

SOMETIMES SHE WEARS A SCRUNCHIE ON HER EARS SO THAT THEY DON’T GET WET.
mememolly:

witsradio:

little-veganite:

mayoroffuckstickjunction:

thecuteoftheday:

Heidi the rabbit!
Heidi has arthritis in her knees and hips so to help with the pain, she swims a few times a week!
Sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet!


“sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet”

Good morning.

SOMETIMES SHE WEARS A SCRUNCHIE ON HER EARS SO THAT THEY DON’T GET WET.
mememolly:

witsradio:

little-veganite:

mayoroffuckstickjunction:

thecuteoftheday:

Heidi the rabbit!
Heidi has arthritis in her knees and hips so to help with the pain, she swims a few times a week!
Sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet!


“sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet”

Good morning.

SOMETIMES SHE WEARS A SCRUNCHIE ON HER EARS SO THAT THEY DON’T GET WET.
mememolly:

witsradio:

little-veganite:

mayoroffuckstickjunction:

thecuteoftheday:

Heidi the rabbit!
Heidi has arthritis in her knees and hips so to help with the pain, she swims a few times a week!
Sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet!


“sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet”

Good morning.

SOMETIMES SHE WEARS A SCRUNCHIE ON HER EARS SO THAT THEY DON’T GET WET.
mememolly:

witsradio:

little-veganite:

mayoroffuckstickjunction:

thecuteoftheday:

Heidi the rabbit!
Heidi has arthritis in her knees and hips so to help with the pain, she swims a few times a week!
Sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet!


“sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet”

Good morning.

SOMETIMES SHE WEARS A SCRUNCHIE ON HER EARS SO THAT THEY DON’T GET WET.
mememolly:

witsradio:

little-veganite:

mayoroffuckstickjunction:

thecuteoftheday:

Heidi the rabbit!
Heidi has arthritis in her knees and hips so to help with the pain, she swims a few times a week!
Sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet!


“sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet”

Good morning.

SOMETIMES SHE WEARS A SCRUNCHIE ON HER EARS SO THAT THEY DON’T GET WET.
mememolly:

witsradio:

little-veganite:

mayoroffuckstickjunction:

thecuteoftheday:

Heidi the rabbit!
Heidi has arthritis in her knees and hips so to help with the pain, she swims a few times a week!
Sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet!


“sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet”

Good morning.

SOMETIMES SHE WEARS A SCRUNCHIE ON HER EARS SO THAT THEY DON’T GET WET.

mememolly:

witsradio:

little-veganite:

mayoroffuckstickjunction:

thecuteoftheday:

Heidi the rabbit!

Heidi has arthritis in her knees and hips so to help with the pain, she swims a few times a week!

Sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet!

“sometimes she wears a scrunchie on her ears so that they don’t get wet”


Good morning.

SOMETIMES SHE WEARS A SCRUNCHIE ON HER EARS SO THAT THEY DON’T GET WET.

buzzfeed:

lol parents   [x]

Taken at Another Day/Another Time.

My friend got a guest role on SVU. He had a table read with the guest stars and the series regulars. Including Raúl. Happiness.

poppypicklesticks:

anotherstarinthesky:

empresspinto:

nigga-chan:

People need to realize the significance of this post, because when I reblogged it it was just blank so I think some people may not understand what this is trying to say

Adopting an animal (or buying from someone close to you who has recently had puppies, kittens, etc) is not like simply going to the store and buying a toy. You do not just get to throw it away once you are done with it and it stops being cute in your eyes

This is a real living thing that has emotions, needs, and wants, not something to be thrown away when YOU are done after YOU entered at commitment to raise and care for this animal. 

What’s just as bad as dumping the animal off just anywhere you want, whether it be on the side of the road or in a shelter, is that a lot of these animals end up dying after that. Animals are NOT always adopted and strays are not always picked up. Animals can get put down, run over, tortured, and a list of other things 

People should really think about what they are responsible for before they bring an animal into their life

Not to mention that that animal loves you, you are his world, and when you drop him off at the shelter - or worse, in the street - you are abandoning him. He doesn’t know what he did wrong, he thinks you’ll come back, maybe you just dropped him off for a bit and you’ll come back to him.
Not only did you make a commitment, but that animal loves you and throwing them away isn’t just breaking that commitment, it’s throwing away someone who doesn’t understand why you don’t love him anymore and where you went.

This is so important. Animals are NOT toys you just can’t return them because you got bored. Think first before you buy a cute little puppy for your stupid girlfriend or sister or whatever. Okay. This just make me so mad that I can’t keep talking about it. Seriously you have no heart if you do this. Seriously

This shit pisses me off

How could you be so hateful to that poor puppy who loves you 

(Source: twocentslice)

dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.
On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:
"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”
Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”
Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.
The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.
Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.
Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.
Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.
dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.
On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:
"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”
Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”
Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.
The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.
Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.
Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.
Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.

On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:

"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”

Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”

Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.

The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.

Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.

Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.

Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

choked:

dewgongo:

dethgripz:

dichotomization:

A skeleton of a mother, and her baby, who both died during her pregnancy.

this is so fucking cool

how on earth is this cool this is literally the remains of a mother and a child she never even got to see. have some respect smh

its cool because its an intact skeleton within an intact skeleton. sad sure, but still cool, get off the pedestal. 

choked:

dewgongo:

dethgripz:

dichotomization:

A skeleton of a mother, and her baby, who both died during her pregnancy.

this is so fucking cool

how on earth is this cool this is literally the remains of a mother and a child she never even got to see. have some respect smh

its cool because its an intact skeleton within an intact skeleton. sad sure, but still cool, get off the pedestal. 

impala-in-beacon-hills:

randomawesomnesscorner:

hho-hhe:

When someone unfollows me I take it very personally.

is it porn you want

me 5 minutes ago….